4 Marketing Tips for Nonfiction Niche Writers

Today’s guest post is a reprint from years back by Jennifer Hancock, author and speaker, who has some great insights on focusing on niche.

I published my first nonfiction book back in August 2010. My book was written for a very specific niche. Here are four things I learned about niche marketing.

1) It’s easier than selling to everyone

Like most nonfiction writers. I wrote my book to change the world. My wisdom is so amazing that the world would simply be a better place if everyone just followed my advice. The problem is that nobody knows me.

Sure, I have friends who treat me like their personal encyclopedia, asking me for advice on everything from what bunnies and eggs have to do with Easter to how to reconcile their relationship with their estranged adult children living in another country.
Continue Reading…

3 Ways For Nonfiction Writers to Plant Marketing Seeds

Today’s post is a reprint from years back, from author Dineen Miller, who shares great insights into how novelists can use marketing approaches nonfiction authors are familiar with, to build up early interest in their book before it comes out. 

Nothing like a book contract to make you aware of what everyone else is doing. And you want to know what works best, right? The problem is, we’re looking for one formula in an industry that’s basically at the whim and whimsy of personal preference and word of mouth. Continue Reading…

Open Your Scenes with These 3 Cinematic Techniques

Let’s get to basics on writing fiction. And that’s your setup in the first few pages. Readers will often stop reading before they finish the first page of your story. While this has always been true, in this fast-paced age that foments impatience, it’s even more true.

If a writer doesn’t deliver what a reader hopes for on that first page, it’s going to be tough to convince the reader to stick around for the whole chapter—let alone the whole book.

We’ve been looking at all the things needed on a first page of a novel or short story. And while it’s not a hard-and-fast rule that all these elements have to show up on page 1, the more elements a writer includes, the better.

This, of course, is going to vary a lot. And if a writer is starting with a prologue or some scene that doesn’t introduce the protagonist, that makes a difference as well. But the overall objective, regardless of opening scene, isn’t going to change. And that is to engage the reader. Continue Reading…

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