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Is the Drive for Success Stealing Your Joy?

To continue with the exploration of success and motivation, I’ve asked a therapist to share some thoughts on this topic. Today’s guest post is from my author friend and client Rita Shulte. Rita is a therapist who has some great insights about success and finding joy in our vocations. I asked her to write something for Writing for Life that would encourage and help writers to thrive in their writing journey.

 

As writers we all want to be a success. We want to have our words touch people’s hearts; we want to somehow be immortalized through our work, and at the end of the day we want to sell books. That seems pretty normal—but percolating under the unconscious surface, could there be deeper reasons that being a success is so important to us? And, is the drive to “make it” stealing our joy? Continue Reading…

The Positive Side of Rejection

Today’s guest post is from author and blogger Angela Ackerman, whose insightful wisdom can be found at The Bookshelf Muse.

I bet a few eyebrows jumped up at reading the title of this post. In fact, right now people are crossing their arms and expelling a bitter laugh or two as they recall the soul-eating, BP-oil-spill darkness that accompanied their last rejection. Something positive? What, it came in an email so no trees had to die to deliver it? Come on, Angela, get real.

Okay, first of all, saving trees is a good thing. 🙂 But that’s not what I mean. All rejections, paper or otherwise, have a positive side. Continue Reading…

Finding Your Footing as the Ground Shifts Beneath You

There’s a moment for many writers when a tectonic shift occurs in their writing process, one that may not even be all that noticeable on the surface, but sends out powerful waves across the landscape of their writing life. I’ve seen this happen with dozens of my editing clients as they near either the completion of writing their book or upon finalizing a rewrite and seeing “the end” near in sight for that particular project. This shift manifests in various ways, but the early signs start with questions about “what to do, now that I’m done.” Continue Reading…