Tag Archive - Moving Shots

Creating Aha Moments in Your Novel by Pulling Back

In continuation of last week’s post on using Pull Back shots in your novel, we’re going to look at a couple more facets to this very powerful and versatile shot. When the camera pulls back and shows a wider scope in a scene, more is revealed. When we pull our attention away from something particular or specific to something with a broader scope or a wider perspective, we in a sense do the same thing. What makes a Pull Back exceptionally powerful in a novel is the way it can work on two levels at the same time—literally and figuratively. But whether you use it for just one or both purposes, A Pull Back always grabs the reader’s attention. It says, “Look at the bigger picture. Now see what you didn’t see before.” But Pull Backs do even more. Continue Reading…

Pull Back for Revelation

In the last two posts I talked about the Zoom shot and how powerful it can be for revealing important details. Now we’re going to see just how powerful the Pull Back is. Obviously, a Pull Back is just what’s implied. The camera pulls back to reveal a bigger picture. This is perhaps my favorite camera shot to use because of the power of revelation. And not just in a literal sense. As you saw in the last post, the character Jack in When Sparrows Fall has a mental pull back as he realizes a “bigger picture” that’s key in the story. No doubt moments like these are the most memorable and emotionally charged in any novel, and that’s why I encourage writers to learn about this camera shot and find places to use it in order to supercharge their stories. Continue Reading…

Zooming In on the Details

We’re starting a detailed look at moving camera shots. Moving shots in a movie are crucial in telling the viewer to pay attention and watch not just what or how is happening but why. With the camera zooming in or pulling back, or panning across a scene,  specific details are shown in the action that mustn’t be missed. Novelists can utilize the same technique to supercharge their novels. instead of showing scenes from one set, stagnant angle, they can make their scenes dynamic, fluid, riveting, by moving the camera around. Continue Reading…

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