Tag Archive - writing life

Finding Your Footing as the Ground Shifts Beneath You

There’s a moment for many writers when a tectonic shift occurs in their writing process, one that may not even be all that noticeable on the surface, but sends out powerful waves across the landscape of their writing life. I’ve seen this happen with dozens of my editing clients as they near either the completion of writing their book or upon finalizing a rewrite and seeing “the end” near in sight for that particular project. This shift manifests in various ways, but the early signs start with questions about “what to do, now that I’m done.” Continue Reading…

To Dream, Perchance to Cry

I think it’s a good thing to take a look at why you write. If you’re writing because you must, because you feel driven and have a deep desire to reach an audience and have a readership that loves your books, it’s good to step back and examine your motivation.

If your desire is to entertain, motivate, inspire, move, elicit a certain reaction, or push an agenda, then it’s important to understand why this is important to you.

Why? Because once you understand your need to write and what is driving it, you can honestly and practically both assess and plan how you will handle your writing life.

For, I’m talking about writing as a life—for those who write because they have to. Not the person who gets one great idea and throws together what they feel will be a big best seller to cash out, but the person who is deluged with words, ideas, stories, characters, premises. For such people, writing is life. A life without writing would be barren and miserable. Continue Reading…

Am I Crazy or What?

You want to be a what?? Are you crazy?? Let’s see—years of grueling hard work, rejection, frustration, terrible odds, impossible-to-reach goals. You have more hope of winning the lottery than becoming a best-selling author. You’ve heard the statistics. Each year hundreds of thousands of books are written. Literary agents get over three hundred queries a week, but they might only take on a handful of authors. Acquisitions editors receive a hundred submissions from top agents weekly, but they may pick only three of those titles to publish in a year.

Some authors have it easier. They may write to a specific genre, such as short romantic suspense, that needs formulaic novels, which allows for a proficient writer to have steady contracts writing similar books.

But for most wanna-be novelists, the prospect of getting published by a top publishing house and becoming a successful (read: making enough money to quit your day job and having people in the market recognize your name) is close to nothing. Continue Reading…

Page 24 of 25« First...1020«2122232425»