What Will You Sacrifice to Be a Better Writer?

Today’s guest post is by Beth Cadman.

Before taking the plunge to write full-time, I often found myself imagining how wonderful it must be.

To be able to manage my own time, to work wherever and whenever I wanted.

To sit in coffee shops, looking fantastically artistic and observing the world passing by, while the inspiration for a new book just “came to me.”

To never have another pointless team meeting again, or create another project management document, or Excel spreadsheet, or be bossed around by my very bossy boss.

To have the unwavering support of family and friends, who would eagerly read everything I wrote.

To live my life knowing that I wasn’t just another sucker in the rat race, that I was true to myself, and inevitably, definitely, the universe would reward me for that by making me a celebrated, world-famous author in no time at all. Continue Reading…

5 Writing Lessons Learned from Margaret Atwood

Today’s guest post is by Dave Chesson.

Thanks to the golden age of television, Margaret Atwood is finally gaining the recognition she deserves.

Don’t get me wrong. Atwood has always been known for publishing politically provocative, emotionally engaging fiction.

However, due to the runaway success of the Handmaid’s Tale, not to mention the topical relevance of the themes to which it speaks, Margaret Atwood is on the radar like never before. This has only increased with the announcement of her upcoming new novel.

So what does this mean for you as a writer?

First, take inspiration. It’s possible to publish the story you truly want to tell, with a controversial political message, and still experience the maximum extent of success possible. Continue Reading…

3 Ways Insecurity Hurts Your Writing  

Today’s guest post is by Braeden Phillips.

Have you ever given a piece of writing to a friend to read and had butterflies in your stomach as you watched her read it?

Most writers know what I am talking about.

Whether we’re doubting our own abilities, dealing with criticism, or struggling with our first draft, insecurity is a common emotion that a lot of writers feel.

But I think insecurity is far more dangerous than a lot of us realize. From what I have seen, it isn’t just a bad feeling but is rather a serious leech on your storytelling abilities.

Today we’re going to look at three ways insecurity hurts your writing and what to do about this dangerous feeling. Continue Reading…

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