Tag Archive - indie publishing

Self-Published Authors Share 5 Things They Learned in 2012 ~ Part 4

Today’s guest post continues the 12-part series I’ve launched in this new year: asking self-published authors what are the top 5 things they’ve learned in the last year. Last year I featured numerous guest posts from indie authors who’d been successful, and I noted the diversity of reasons for their success—some completely in contradiction to another’s—so I thought it would be helpful to have more authors give their insights into the most valuable lessons they’ve learned. Hopefully it will help you navigate the convoluted and confusing maze of indie publishing and give you ideas on how best to spend your time so that it produces the results you desire in your writing career.

Today’s guest post is from Michael Drakich, and although he shares only 3 things, they’re detailed and insightful:

I’ve been asked to describe some things I’ve learned in the past year as a self-published author. The truth of them is they all involve the school of hard knocks. There is no easy path to success. Here are three major things with a number of other tidbits of advice mingled in.

1. Amazon is the 900-pound gorilla. Everyone knows the joke: Where does a 900-pound gorilla sit? Anywhere he wants to. Continue Reading…

Self-Published Authors Share 5 Things They Learned in 2012 ~ Part 3

Today’s guest post continues the 12-part series I’ve launched in this new year: asking self-published authors what are the top 5 things they’ve learned in the last year. Last year I featured numerous guest posts from indie authors who’d been successful, and I noted the diversity of reasons for their success—some completely in contradiction to another’s—so I thought it would be helpful to have more authors give their insights into the most valuable lessons they’ve learned. Hopefully it will help you navigate the convoluted and confusing maze of indie publishing and give you ideas on how best to spend your time so that it produces the results you desire in your writing career.

Today’s guest post is from Melissa Bowersock:

Thinking about self-publishing? The idea can be daunting, but it is nowhere near impossible. It’s being done all around the globe, more and more often, by more and more writers.

I kind of backed into self-publishing. My first five books were traditionally published, two by a New York house, three by small presses. When my first two books went out of print and the rights reverted back to me, I paid to have them published by iUniverse just to keep them active. Sometime later I began to hear about self-publishing and I realized that opened up a whole new ballgame. I have since self-published my last five books, and I absolutely love it! Continue Reading…

Self-Published Authors Share 5 Things They Learned in 2012 ~ Part 2

Today’s guest post continues the 12-part series I’ve launched in this new year: asking self-published authors what are the top 5 things they’ve learned in the last year. Last year I featured numerous guest posts from indie authors who’d been successful, and I noted the diversity of reasons for their success—some completely in contradiction to another’s—so I thought it would be helpful to have more authors give their insights into the most valuable lessons they’ve learned. Hopefully it will help you navigate the convoluted and confusing maze of indie publishing and give you ideas on how best to spend your time so that it produces the results you desire in your writing career.

Today’s guest post is from Rachelle Ayala:

Hi, I’m Rachelle Ayala, and I self-published my first book less than a year ago. I’ve always known I would self-publish because my first novel did not fit into any of the well known genre guidelines. It is based loosely on a Bible story, but introduced elements of fantasy and romance tending toward the steamy side. My second novel is an edgy technothriller with cuss words and Christian themes of brokenness and redemption. My latest novel, Hidden Under Her Heart, is centered on the controversial subject of abortion and its effect on post-abortive men and women. Self-publishing gives me the artistic freedom to bring my words directly to the reading public. I make my books available in both ebook format through the major retailers as well as print book through Createspace. The only cost to self-publishing is hiring the editor and paying for cover art. I do the document formatting myself and upload to Amazon and other online retailers.

Continue Reading…

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