Tag Archive - writing life

5 Practical Goals for Writers to Avoid Overwhelm

Sometimes the writing journey feels overwhelming. There aren’t enough hours in the day to accomplish the mind-boggling amount of things we writers feel must get done in order to grow not just as writers but in order to establish our place in the publishing world.

Years ago, all an author had to do was write a book and send it off to a publisher (one handwritten copy at a time!), and if her manuscript was accepted, the publisher did all the work of publishing and promoting.

Now, authors have to be writer, marketer, publicist—and sometimes publisher—in order to make strides to become known and to have their books sold and distributed.

And still, after long hours each week applying ourselves to so many career-promoting tasks, we may feel frustrated and unsure whether we’ve accomplished anything at all.

And our books? Well, sometimes we don’t even have time to write, it seems. Continue Reading…

The 5 Different Monsters Hiding in Writers’ Closets

Today’s guest post is by Kleia Paluca.

All writers, both beginning and published ones, have something to fear. That’s because writing can be a personal ordeal, and everyone has their monsters.

As Hemingway said: “There is nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed.”

For many of us writers, there’s nothing as terrifying as baring our soul through our writing. We’re offering it up for others to pick apart and criticize. It’s this kind of lambasting that we writers would do anything to avoid.

You would think that we’d be done with monsters by now. After all, we’re not exactly nine years old anymore. But as logical and experienced as we believe ourselves to be, we’re still plagued by monsters of a different kind that freeze us in our tracks and prevent us from living life to the fullest.

These monsters are our fears, and we writers have at least one or two of them hiding in our closet. Continue Reading…

Think Small to Avoid Writer’s Block

Today’s post is by Jane Anne Staw

I recently gave a talk at a writers’ conference on thinking small to avoid writer’s block. After the talk, one of the participants approached me, laughing. “I know you’re right about small and writing. I went away for a month to finish my book. I promised myself a drink at the end of each writing day. By the second week, I wasn’t getting any writing done, so I decided that a drink at noon was OK. By the third week, when I still wasn’t writing, I told myself that a mimosa at breakfast was just fine!”

Many writers I’ve worked with have made similar discoveries about leaving too much time to write. By setting aside one month to write all day every day, the writer at the conference was thinking much too large. Very few writers can keep up their writing momentum for a full eight hours, day after day.

Not only can most writers not sustain this grueling momentum, committing themselves to this much writing time each day has a negative effect: it churns up a writer’s anxiety, making it much more difficult to sit down and write. That’s why, by the third week, the writer from the conference had not gotten any writing done. Continue Reading…

Page 1 of 2012345»1020...Last »