Tag Archive - book marketing

Considerations When Choosing Your Niche Genre

Amazon has many categories and subcategories for fiction, and if you upload your book into the Kindle store and choose general categories, you’re going to be competing with hundreds of thousands of books.

What you want for best discoverability is to have your book in categories that sell well yet don’t have tremendous competition.

All novels can fit in a multitude of subgenres, which we’ll see in just a moment. So while you might have in mind to write fantasy or mystery, which are popular genres that sell well, notching down to a couple of smaller niche genres will help your book have a better chance of coming up high in the search engines.

You need to be willing to adjust the type of novel you write or want to write. You may already be writing in a popular genre, such as romance. But this objective of finding a niche subgenre might mean you have to consider writing something a bit different from what you currently write or want to write. It may mean choosing an entirely different genre altogether.

What’s most important when considering a genre to write in is this: You should feel competent or comfortable with the thought of writing in that genre. Continue Reading…

The Book Marketing Shakeup

Today’s post is by Troy Lambert.

For the Indie author, marketing has always been a challenge. As we discover new advertising outlets, so do those at the Big 5 and even other large publishing houses. They have money that goes deeper than ours and can outbid us on a number of platforms.

What does that mean? Well, advertisers who were putting their ad spend into television, newspapers, and other physical “shotgun”-style ads have finally determined that targeted digital marketing is where it’s at. That means the influx of a lot of big money to places like Amazon and Facebook—places where authors used to stand a fighting chance to compete for ad space.

But there are countless indie authors who are now experiencing something new: ads that used to work, that used to get them a great return or at least a reasonable one, are no longer working.

By that I don’t mean sales are declining or click-through rates are lower. I mean they have nearly disappeared. Is this the death of the successful indie author? What’s next in the marketing world for authors after the latest shakeup? Continue Reading…

The Benefits and Drawbacks of Immersion for Writers

Today’s guest post is by therapist Hayley Watkins.

Immersion is often a wonderful experience. It’s a particular state of mental involvement that many of us, as writers, find deeply comforting and satisfying, and it’s quite likely that it’s what draws you back again and again for more.

But like so many things, immersion is a double-edged sword. On the plus side it gives you the cocoon-like sense of protection from everything but the world you’ve created on paper. It’s also intense enough that when you withdraw from your writing you walk away feeling satisfied.

Both of these feelings offer big psychological benefits. After all, everybody needs to feel safe. When we feel safe, we feel ready to meet the demands life throws at us.

Satisfaction is the other side of that coin and can be described as a feeling of fulfilment of our desires or needs that we indulge in to avoid boredom or frustration. Safety protects (but may limit) us, while the pursuit of satisfaction stretches us. So far so good. Continue Reading…

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