Tag Archive - writing tips

7 Mistakes to Avoid When Writing about the Military

Today’s guest post is by authors J. R. Olson and David Bruns:

As long as there’s been a military, there have been authors writing about the military. It’s a natural fit. The military provides the perfect combination of conflict and character, adversary and attitude. Some novels, like Joseph Heller’s Catch-22, seek to satirize war and the military, while others, such as Steven Spielberg’s Saving Private Ryan, offer a more serious view of the battlefield. Whether your literary goal is to honor or skewer the armed forces, nothing bothers military veterans more than when well-meaning authors make factual errors about simple military customs.

We’re a pair of US Navy veterans with a combined thirty-five years of service who blog and write under the moniker The Two Navy Guys. We’re here to dish out the truth about 7 common mistakes we see from authors writing about the military: Continue Reading…

You’re Not Alone: 10 Perfectly Normal Struggles Writers Face

Today’s guest post is a fun and helpful infographic by best-selling author Warren Adler. 

I have been lucky as hell making writing a career. But then, one must consider that I did suffer through endless rejections of my work until I was forty-five years old, when I was finally able to interest publishers.

Real writers write because of their artistic need, above all. It is a great and miraculous calling, and its pursuit deserves all of one’s energy and imagination. Without a doubt, there are always struggles along the way, so I thought I’d share a few of my own, which I think are universal.

So here are 10 struggles you might face as a writer, but take courage—you’re not alone.

Continue Reading…

Give Your Readers a Ride They’ll Never Forget

Today’s guest post is by suspense author Erika Mitchell:

When I was ten, a family friend took me to Disneyland. As we stood in line for Space Mountain, he leaned over to me and said, “You’ve gotta be careful on this ride. The ceilings are so low, they’ll take your head clean off if you sit up too straight.”

As soon as my butt hit the hard metal seat, I felt myself break out into a nervous sweat. The darkness up ahead was a patch of night sky without any stars in it, and as the ride jerked into motion I scooted down as low into my seat as I could and held on tight to the metal lap bar.

In pure darkness, I felt the car going up, slowly, interminably, just long enough to make me regret ever having gotten on the stupid ride in the first place. When we reached the top, I felt us teeter on the edge just long enough to grab half a gasp and then we were plunging down into Stygian black at what felt like a thousand miles an hour. Before I had a chance to recover from the plunge, the car was bucking left and right in a series of tight turns I couldn’t see coming, the thrill magnified and intensified by the very fact that I couldn’t anticipate anything up ahead. By the time I got off the ride, head still attached to my shoulders, I was hooked. I rode Space Mountain five times that day. Continue Reading…

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